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Brass Tacks

is a DINE BAR in Denver.


I was Art Director and Lead Designer for this one.

I recieved Creative Direction from Josh Wills & Steve Hurd, and help from my studiomate, William Johnston who made a lot of fun elements and coined the byline “dine bar.” He’s an ideas guy.

This was all at the design studio Consume & Create, in Denver.

My largest contributions were designing the wordmark, logo, supporting design and type systems, design & production of the menu system, exterior signage and interior design.

Contributing designers cited on relevant imagery.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUCY BEAUGARD, ORIGINALLY FOR DENVER EATER




The Brass Tacks crew sought to make a bar for the “neighborhood of downtown:” a welcoming and approachable place steeped in familarity and surprise for regulars that call the city of Denver home.



MUSE


The “Blake Street Vault” is one of Denver’s oldest buildings. In the early 1860's the building served as a saloon and boarding house in the center of the first business district of Denver. Historic Denver photos from as early as 1866 depict the Charles Eyser Saloon with covered wagons tied up in front.

Inspired by the building’s many lives, the design language speaks to the history of each tenant of 1526 Blake Street, and how Brass Tacks, too, is leaving a mark on history.




^this is a rendering but the actual building looks exactly like this. THEY NAILED IT. it’s awesome.



^ some of these fun elements were crafted by WILLIAM JOHNSTON


The secondary design system was inspired by “found objects” throughout the eras. Sign painter inspired type, long lost etchings, and art deco frames all come together to make a system that feels like a collection of well-loved artifacts from decades past.


To temper this eclectic design system several border styles were introduced, each informed by natural framing throughout the history of the building; cornicing, curtain rods, and the very same border on the hundred-year-old vault in the basement.






The type system finds its roots in print production methods throughout history: sign painting, wood block and letterpress, diner neon and typewriter styles. Each expression has one foot in the sophistication of the Kentucky Derby and the approachability of a neighborhood bowling alley.





^ WILL JOHNSTON designed those pocket cocktails

A healthy style guide keeps expressions consistent for all teams.



^ WE WORKED WITH SCOUT INTERIORS TO MAKE THIS COME TO LIFE. HERE’S THE ORIGINAL RENDERING

The interior is flush with discoverables and artifacts. Each wall is decorated with found objects. The space feels curated but not staged, like an aunt’s living room.



One of the goals when designing “the window,” was for patrons to be drawn through the space.
A found bingo board and some easily-changed plexiglass panels created a space reminiscent of a memorable and magnetic food truck to draw patrons back.





Brass Tacks. Denver’s first dine bar.
A place for people looking for a place like this.